New Reports from Doctors Show Vitamin D Could Prevent Cancer, Heart Disease

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released a new report that suggests new recommendations for one’s daily intake of the all-important, disease fighting Vitamin D. While many people know that Vitamin D helps to build strong bones and prevent osteoporosis, new studies show it may also play a large role in reducing risks for cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.

While current guidelines set by the Institute of Medicine call for 200 units of Vitamin D daily, the new report suggests 400 units daily, and researcher Adrian Gombart of Oregon State University claims that no less than 800 units of Vitamin D daily is necessary for adults under 50 to remain healthy.

Most of the time people will think of substances such as milk or fish as natural providers of Vitamin D, but adults would have to drink more than 8 glasses of milk a day to get the recommended amount! So how does one get the Vitamin D needed to prevent serious diseases?

Light given off by the sun and tanning beds is the most efficient way to get the suggested daily dose of Vitamin D. The body can synthesize Vitamin D from light in order to keep your body’s vitamin levels at an adequate level. Think about how plants create food through photosynthesis.

10 to 15 minutes per day in a tanning bed, such as those at Sunday’s Blue Box Tanning Resorts, could be the answer to increasing your daily intake of Vitamin D, and defending against potentially life-threatening disease.

Read more about this news story here and find out information straight from the professionals at the American Academy of Pediatrics.

2 Responses to “New Reports from Doctors Show Vitamin D Could Prevent Cancer, Heart Disease”

  • I want to thank you for your post on the benefits of exposure to sunlight and other forms of ultraviolet radiation, such as that from tanning beds. It is important for people to be fully aware of both the pros and cons of coming into contact with ultraviolet rays, especially because this light can strengthen our bodies against problems such as osteoporosis and “reduce risks for cancer, diabetes, and heart disease,” as you mention. Because in researching this topic I have read several articles mentioning only the health risks of too much sun exposure, I appreciate your contrasting outlook that explains the advantages of sunning and the quantifiable amounts of vitamin D required for healthy living. Also in my research I learned that the vitamin can be obtained easily through one’s diet, leaving tanning as an adequate, but unnecessary alternative. Therefore, what I found most interesting in your post was the fact that “adults would have to drink more than 8 glasses of milk a day to get the recommended amount” of vitamin D, putting into perspective the true need for sunlight in satisfying the required daily dosage, which cannot be fulfilled easily through eating fish or drinking milk. However, your claim that “light given off by the sun and tanning beds is the most efficient way” to derive the nutrient is a bit unclear, seeing as the rays of the sun differ from those of indoor bulbs. I am interested to know your thoughts on the difference between the two types, and, in turn, which you would recommend as the better source of the vitamin. Further, though delivered with helpful motives, your proposed solution of “10 to 15 minutes per day in a tanning bed, such as those at Sunday’s Blue Box Tanning Resorts” to ensure proper defense against harmful diseases, may mislead people to think that tan sessions are safe and completely health-promoting. What your readers could be missing is the fact that with the advantages of ultraviolet exposure also come several skin cancer risks, and they therefore may trivialize important warnings of radiation harm because so much emphasis was placed on its benefits. In your opinion, do the pros outweigh the cons?

  • I would love to be able to read it but the text is all brown on a brown background. I'm using Firefox 3.0.11 and have no problems on other sites.

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